Best Way To Get WVO Out Of Clothes???

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biggestsuv's picture
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Joined: 10/24/2007

I tried soap and oxyclean in hot water in the washer and the clothes and rags are still greasy. What is the best way to get the greasyness out??

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Phil's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2004

Sometimes liquid dish detergent will work. Sometimes nothing gets it out.

JP
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Joined: 09/21/2004

The best way is to throw them out. They will(can) catch on fire if washed and dried in a dryer. I know because this has happened to a row of condos in Brewster NY. Cause was a greaser's washed and dried rags stored under a deck. And one of my employee's new cars was totaled when she washed a bunch of greasy kitchen rags, dried them in a commercial dryer, threw them into a basket and placed them in her trunk. The car caught on fire. I guess if you are cautious about drying them you will be ok. Wear the grease stains proudly!

latitude500 (not verified)
latitude500's picture

When I collect grease, I always wear the same cloths so I don't go through so many outfits. LOL But I clean my cloths with ecokleen and it does a great job of cleaning them. And then I just hang them up to dry. You wouldn't want to put them in the drier because yes they might go up in a ball of flame.

The girlfriend wouldn't like that, trust me.

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JBG
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Joined: 04/30/2007

Quote:
Originally posted by: JP
The best way is to throw them out. They will(can) catch on fire if washed and dried in a dryer. I know because this has happened to a row of condos in Brewster NY. Cause was a greaser's washed and dried rags stored under a deck. And one of my employee's new cars was totaled when she washed a bunch of greasy kitchen rags, dried them in a commercial dryer, threw them into a basket and placed them in her trunk. The car caught on fire. I guess if you are cautious about drying them you will be ok. Wear the grease stains proudly!
so you're saying that the process of washing and drying a cloth that has WVO on it somehow makes it more flammable (than it already is)?

Your employee's crash for instance: how did having those rags in the trunk cause combustion? I have greasy (unwashed) rags in my wagon often....just wondering.

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Thesst's picture
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Joined: 04/16/2007

the "dangers" of greasy clothes are largely anecdotal. The reality is, your clothes have to be REALLY greasy to "catch fire" in the dryer. Unless you're rolling around in your grease and pouring a bunch on yourself, you won't have that problem.

Now of course, rags that you're using to soak up grease are another story... just throw those away or wash and then dry them by hanging them outside or something.

JP
JP's picture
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Joined: 09/21/2004

Yep. The washed previously greasy rags always have a residue of oil left behind. I've seen video of a controlled experiment showing greasy rags self combusting. Granted the conditions must be correct. With the added condition of dryer heat it is more likely. I remember another time when my brother used to wash and dry the (restaurant) kitchen rags at a local laundromat because it was too heavy a load for our domestic unit. Well he was banned from that practice because he almost burned down the laundromat. I believe the residue is polymerized oil that causes the rubber like substance in vo tanks. It's a combination of heat and air applied to the vo. I know others at this site can back me up with the fire hazard idea at least. Hanging the washed grease rags to dry remove most of the hazard.

JP
JP's picture
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Joined: 09/21/2004

3 instances of hot dry greasy rags, 3 instances of fire. search for the video link. And yes the greasier, the easier to combust. Just be aware of the danger. and line dry mo betta
Oh, and the fires started after they were removed from dryer and shoved into a bag or box.

Holyoak's picture
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Joined: 01/10/2008

I would try Gojo or another form of oil removing hand cleaner from an autoparts store. I don't know that one that had the added grit would make any difference. Just rub the stuff on and work it in. Then launder like normal.

While I've never used it on wvo I know it works pretty well when dealing with automotive grease on normal clothing.

Good luck and let us know if you find something that works.

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GuitarGerber's picture
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Joined: 04/04/2005

I use orange oil. Get it in a gallon size at a nursery. About $50, but if you put in 2oz. in a gallon of hot water and let it soak overnight, wash the next day with a good detergent and another 2oz. orange oil, and it'll be as clean as it can possibly get. I've tried all kinds of things, but orange oil is the best. Works on everything around the house. It's the only cleaner we've used for 2-3 years.

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Rodd's picture
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Joined: 09/14/2006

Any spray degreaser that you get at wally world or your grocery store will work. I got some greased lightning and it works good. It really depends on how saturated your fabric is be it clothes or rags. I am in the cleaning business and for most spills on carpet, clothes, upholstry and things like that I find palmolive liquid dish soap works best. Any liquid soap that says it cuts through grease will work. You also need to use it before getting it wet w/ water. After you rub the soap in the stain completely you need to rinse all the way out w/ water before washing it. You don't want one of those experiences like you see in old movies w/ suds everywhere. Trust me it happens. On my washing machine at home I have a setting to heat the water up to about 170 F. I usually wash my towels and clothes w/ wvo 2 times before throwing them in the dryer. Also don't use liquid fabric softener like downy w/ wvo fabrics. It will lock in the WVO and the stains. If you don't have an industrial dryer at home then you probably don't need to worry about fires.

I also like the idea of using the orange oil. I use it around the house and it works great. I didn't think of using it on WVO stains. I will have to give it a try and see how it does.

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Rodd

Donniej's picture
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Joined: 01/07/2005

Quote:
Originally posted by: JP
3 instances of hot dry greasy rags, 3 instances of fire. search for the video link. And yes the greasier, the easier to combust. Just be aware of the danger. and line dry mo betta
Oh, and the fires started after they were removed from dryer and shoved into a bag or box.
I rent, therefore I have to try this. Details will follow.

If it does work then can I get to do my own demo at Greasestock? :-)

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Hotwheelbill's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2006

I use Greased Lightning to clean all of my greasy stuff.
Also, when I collect, I use the cheap rubber gloves and some cheap rubber shoes. All of it can be found at Sams.

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cmahrle's picture
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Joined: 11/07/2007

A few days ago in my filtering process I had a seal fail, SPRAYING me with hot (but CLEAN!) grease. This was no small spot here and there, and I couldn't start washing until 4 hours later. I was determined not to have the clothes I was wearing ruined, so I tried several things. I have no idea which worked (or perhaps it was a combination), since it's hard to see if the grease is gone when the clothes are wet and I wasn't going to wait for line-drying between each step.

First, I scrubbed with Dawn in the tub. I then machine-washed with Tide, then again with Arm & Hammer detergent, then again with All (didn't know which might be better, so tried all three). The third time, I put in 1/2 cup of baking soda (per some website I found).

My nylon ski jacket was the easiest (probably didn't even have to machine-wash it). No sign of grease there. The polyester fleece has no sign, either. The jeans don't have any noticeable stain. But the most impressive was the WHITE socks...grease gone. (Although there wasn't much on them...just what soaked through the shoes.) The cotton shirt still has faint staining, but nothing compared to my "regular" grease shirt. I still have hope for that, though...my next step (per another website) is to try a baking soda paste. Anyone try that? Also, anyone try simply hanging it in the sun? I haven't tried that yet, but I've been amazed at how well that works on some stains when I've had to line-dry clothes in third-world countries.

greenlogic's picture
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Joined: 05/16/2006

Allright here's the Martha Stewart tip ofthe day that works great. Any spot of oil on clothes can be gotten out by using fresh oil. Rub the spot with fresh plant based oil and immediately wash it with dish soap. I have done this many times and it works perfect. I have not ruined a single piece of clothing from greasing. Something about the new oil activating the old stain and bonding with it and washing out with the fresh grease. Not sure why it works, but it does nonetheless.

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