Jetta burning engine oil

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Billy's picture
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Joined: 08/11/2009

I have noticed that my 03 Jetta has been burning oil for the last few months. It also started blowing some blue smoke on cold starts. I was wondering if anyone had any ideas why? Worse case scenario is the valve guides are worn but hopefully something else. The car seems to run fine otherwise.

veggpwr's picture
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Joined: 09/27/2010

Worse case scenario is the valve guides are worn
Or it could be the piston rings, worn or broken. Can be identified by compression test.

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'05 Cummins CTD 24V HPCR RAM 2500 QC SLT SB Black 4X4 48RE  325 hp  610 ft.lbs
GC Kit  + 3rd Tank WVO(80%)/RUG(20-30%)  +  Co-Pilot 
3-Tank Operation managed by Co-Pilot: Blending(warm up) / Veggie(hot run) / Diesel(purge for next start)
Smarty Jr  40/70/100 hp (Timing Map Modification)
 

Billy's picture
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Joined: 08/11/2009

After not starting first crank I discovered a leak at the back of the injection pump. That could explain the hard starting. Wonder if that could have anything to do with burning engine oil. I think the IP is lubricated by engine oil. My mechanic said a compression test wouldn't do any good.

donb123's picture
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Joined: 08/01/2011

If the leak is fluid running down the bottom of the IP it's the o-ring the goes in between the two pieces of the IP.  Dieselgeeks.com has a nice kit for replacing that.  I believe fuel lubricates the pump, not motor oil.
 
I suspect the two things are unrelated.

veggpwr's picture
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Wonder if that could have anything to do with burning engine oil. I think the IP is lubricated by engine oil.
The IP is lubricated by diesel. Your are leaking diesel.
 
My mechanic said a compression test wouldn't do any good.
There are two ways that engine oil can get into the combustion chamber, the valve stem seal or the rings. A compression test can tell whether it's the rings or the seal. If the compression test on each cylinder is good check the valve stem seals. If one cylinder fails compression test you have problem with valves/seats or rings on that cylinder. To further identify whether it's the rings or valves you can introduce some engine oil into that cylinder combustion chamber and do the compression test again. If the psi reading gets better you have ring problem.
A good compression test tells it's the valve stem seal problem but it cannot tell which one! Have to open the valve cover......

__________________

'05 Cummins CTD 24V HPCR RAM 2500 QC SLT SB Black 4X4 48RE  325 hp  610 ft.lbs
GC Kit  + 3rd Tank WVO(80%)/RUG(20-30%)  +  Co-Pilot 
3-Tank Operation managed by Co-Pilot: Blending(warm up) / Veggie(hot run) / Diesel(purge for next start)
Smarty Jr  40/70/100 hp (Timing Map Modification)
 

Billy's picture
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Joined: 08/11/2009

Thanks for the info.  I will have to get the leak on the injection pump fixed first.  I am pretty sure it is the main seal between the two parts of the pump.  By what I have read it doesn't look like a job for a home mechanic who doesn't have all the tools.  I will ask the shop again about doing a compression test. For some reason they didn't have the tools or just didn't want to do it.

veggpwr's picture
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Joined: 09/27/2010

Have turbo???
The turbo is lubed by engine oil and seal could be leaking. Check for sign of engine oil after the turbo.

__________________

'05 Cummins CTD 24V HPCR RAM 2500 QC SLT SB Black 4X4 48RE  325 hp  610 ft.lbs
GC Kit  + 3rd Tank WVO(80%)/RUG(20-30%)  +  Co-Pilot 
3-Tank Operation managed by Co-Pilot: Blending(warm up) / Veggie(hot run) / Diesel(purge for next start)
Smarty Jr  40/70/100 hp (Timing Map Modification)
 

donb123's picture
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Joined: 08/01/2011

The only tools required are a wrench to take off the hard fuel lines and a torx bit for the IP.  It's very easy actually.  There's videos on youtube and color photo instrux at dieselgeeks.  I did it and I'm not anything like a mechanic.

veggpwr's picture
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Joined: 09/27/2010

Check this out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPk94mQyack
Also:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdQbrdv78A4&feature=channel
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nwyTmKVf0I&feature=channel
The seal can be replaced without removing the pump from the engine.
 
If you don't want to open the pump then you have to remove the pump and put it on a bench vise with pump head upwards so when you separate the pump head from the pump body the shim will not drop off. Loose the four bolts a little bit until the seal is exposed then you can replace the seal.

__________________

'05 Cummins CTD 24V HPCR RAM 2500 QC SLT SB Black 4X4 48RE  325 hp  610 ft.lbs
GC Kit  + 3rd Tank WVO(80%)/RUG(20-30%)  +  Co-Pilot 
3-Tank Operation managed by Co-Pilot: Blending(warm up) / Veggie(hot run) / Diesel(purge for next start)
Smarty Jr  40/70/100 hp (Timing Map Modification)
 

Billy's picture
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Joined: 08/11/2009

Those are some great videos. Looks like you have to have a tool to rotate the cam in the pump.
I suspected the turbo seal might be my problem so I pulled off the tube going into the intercooler. Supposedly if the turbo seal has failed then the inter cooler will be full of oil. I extracted maybe 2 ounces. Some would say that is normal. My mechanic also said the car would smoke all the time if it was the turbo. Who's to say? I think I would rather have it be the turbo rather than rings or valve seals. Still expensive to replace turbo but less than a engine rebuild.

veggpwr's picture
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Joined: 09/27/2010

Looks like you have to have a tool to rotate the cam in the pump.
You can rotate the crankshaft with a 19mm socket instead of rotating the cam.
I extracted maybe 2 ounces. Some would say that is normal. My mechanic also said the car would smoke all the time if it was the turbo. Who's to say?
True.
If it is the rings the car would smoke all the time too.
If it only smoke at start up after the car is shut off for several hours and it clears away later then it would say it's the valve stem seals.
I think I would rather have it be the turbo rather than rings or valve seals. Still expensive to replace turbo but less than a engine rebuild.
I think the valve stem seals can be replaced by just remove the valve cover, cam, rockers and springs. You don't have to remove the head. Not a big job.
 
Try google "replace valve stem seals". Good Luck!!!
http://www.enginebasics.com/Advanced%20Engine%20Tuning/Changing%20Valve%...
http://lextreme.com/valve_seals.html

__________________

'05 Cummins CTD 24V HPCR RAM 2500 QC SLT SB Black 4X4 48RE  325 hp  610 ft.lbs
GC Kit  + 3rd Tank WVO(80%)/RUG(20-30%)  +  Co-Pilot 
3-Tank Operation managed by Co-Pilot: Blending(warm up) / Veggie(hot run) / Diesel(purge for next start)
Smarty Jr  40/70/100 hp (Timing Map Modification)
 

donb123's picture
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Joined: 08/01/2011

You don't have to do any of that stuff if you get the kit from dieselgeeks.com.  They sell a bolt that you replace in the IP that lets it come apart just far enough to slip on a new viton o-ring without taking it apart and without moving the shaft and without losing the spacer inside the unit.  I did it a few weeks ago.  Easy job; and cheap.

Billy's picture
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Joined: 08/11/2009

Donb, do you remember how long it took you? Was there any unexpected problems that came up? Do you have to have a mighty vac to reprime the pump or is there another way? I'm thinking about doing it myself but if I come across a difficult situation or drop something somewhere where I shouldn't have I sometimes get really frustrated and upset and I'm afraid the wife is going to tell me I should of taken the damn car in and had someone else fix it. It's those "I told you so" scinarios I try to avoid. Thanks for the input.

donb123's picture
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Joined: 08/01/2011

It took several hours.  It probalby shouldn't have taken that long but I couldn't find my open ended wrenches and was using an adjustable wrench which doesn't work on all the hard lines.  I drove it and was really impressed with myself until a couple of lines blew open and sprayed fuel everywhere :)  Then I bothered to find the proper wrenches to tighten down the lines.  Seriously though, read the instrux for Viton o-ring at dieselgeeks.  It's quite easy.
As far as re-priming the pump a MV helps but it's not mandatory.  They're really cheap at Harbor Freight however.  I'm sure you could ensure that your fuel filter is full and then just turn it over a few times and it'd be fine.  I've run the thing out of fuel and primed it with the starter more times than I can remember.

veggpwr's picture
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Joined: 09/27/2010

http://www.dieselgeek.com/v/install_guides/TDI_Injection_Pump_Head_Seal_Replacement.pdf
That would work.
Make sure you set injection pump "on cam" in step 1.
 
You can try to prime the pump by doing:
Disconnect the fuel supply hose to the pump and hook up to a small can of diesel at a higher level than the pump. Crack open the lines at injectors. Crank until engine starts. Shut off, tighten all the lines, re-connect the supply hose. Re-start engine again. 
 
If you have an intank electric lift pump, forget the above procedure. Just crack open lines and crank.

__________________

'05 Cummins CTD 24V HPCR RAM 2500 QC SLT SB Black 4X4 48RE  325 hp  610 ft.lbs
GC Kit  + 3rd Tank WVO(80%)/RUG(20-30%)  +  Co-Pilot 
3-Tank Operation managed by Co-Pilot: Blending(warm up) / Veggie(hot run) / Diesel(purge for next start)
Smarty Jr  40/70/100 hp (Timing Map Modification)